Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, energy consumption

BALTIMORE (November 4, 2020) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $86 million in grants and loans today to reduce water pollution and save energy. The board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments to protect public health and the environment,” said Maryland Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles. “Moving forward with the Piscataway sewage treatment plant bio-energy project, connecting Anne Arundel County businesses to public sewer systems, reducing harmful stormwater runoff in Carroll County and upgrading a wastewater treatment plant in St. Mary’s County will help us to green and grow the state’s economy and continue to be leaders on climate change and the Chesapeake Bay.”



The following projects were approved today:



Piscataway Wastewater Treatment Plant Bio-Energy project – Prince George’s County

An $85,001,527 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission will help fund the design and construction of bio-energy facilities at the Piscataway Wastewater Treatment Plant, which will receive sludge from other WSSC wastewater treatment plants. The project will include a process to precondition sludge prior to anaerobic digestion, an anaerobic digestion facility and a facility to produce dewatered “Class A biosolids,” which can be beneficially reused as fertilizer on farms and sold to home gardeners. Also, a combined heat and power facility will be built to capture the biogas from the digestion to produce steam and electricity for the plant. Odor control, process water treatment, generators, and boilers are also included in the project. The project will recover renewable energy and reduce energy, chemical and sludge disposal costs. Energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy and biogas can help the Chesapeake Bay by reducing nitrogen pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. The project will be constructed in accordance with coastal and non-coastal resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.



I-97 Business Park Sewer Extension project – Anne Arundel County

A $911,121 Bay Restoration Fund grant to I-97 Sewer, LLC (St. John Properties) will help fund the design and construction of a connection to convey wastewater from the I-97 Business Park, which now uses septic systems, to the Anne Arundel County Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility. The Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility has been upgraded to treat wastewater to Enhanced Nutrient Removal levels. The project also includes the abandonment and removal of the existing septic systems. This project will reduce the total nitrogen discharge to the groundwater by about 2,325 pounds per year. The project is part of the Maryland Department of the Environment’s efforts to connect failing septic systems to public sewers to reduce nutrient pollution and eliminate public health problems exacerbated by climate change.



Carroll County Stormwater Management Restoration – Carroll County

A $577,904 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Carroll County will help fund projects to reduce the impact of stormwater runoff in urban areas of Carroll County as part of the county’s efforts to improve water quality in local streams and the Chesapeake Bay and to comply with its municipal stormwater permit. The work consists of the retrofit of existing stormwater management facilities, the creation of new stormwater management facilities and stream restoration. This board action is for the contract for East West Pond in Mount Airy, one of four contracts in the project. This project is consistent with Maryland’s climate change adaptation and resiliency objectives through the reduction of runoff that is exacerbated by increased precipitation or flooding events.



Point Lookout State Park Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – St. Mary’s County

A $53,035 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Maryland Environmental Service will fund the planning for an Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrade of the Point Lookout State Park Wastewater Treatment Plant. The current plant services 150 camps. The planning study will evaluate alternatives for the upgrade, which is necessary to reduce nutrients discharged to the Lower Tidal Potomac River. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay restoration plan. This project will be constructed in accordance with resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.


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