Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve drinking water system

BALTIMORE (October 7, 2020) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $5.6 million in grants and loans today to reduce water pollution and improve a drinking water system. The board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments to protect public health and the environment,” said Maryland Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles. “Reducing combined sewer overflows in Western Maryland, connecting Anne Arundel County businesses to public sewer systems, upgrading wastewater treatment plants in Western Maryland and the Eastern Shore and improving an Eastern Shore drinking water system will help us to green and grow the state’s economy and lead in the race to protect and restore Chesapeake Bay watersheds.”


The following projects were approved today:


Frostburg Combined Sewer Overflow Elimination, Stoyer Street Corridor project – Allegany County

A 2,001,788 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the City of Frostburg will help fund the next phase in a project to separate combined sewers within the City of Frostburg and reduce the frequency and volume of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) that occur during wet weather. This project will replace the aging combined sewer system with a new separated sanitary system to significantly reduce wet weather wastewater flows to downstream facilities of Allegany County, the Town of LaVale and the City of Cumberland Wastewater Treatment Plant. The project will reduce CSO discharges in compliance with MDE’s consent decree with the City of Frostburg. This project is consistent with Maryland’s climate change adaptation and resiliency objectives through the reduction of runoff that is exacerbated by increased precipitation or flooding events.


BWI Commerce Park Sewer Extension project – Anne Arundel County

A $1,336,176 Bay Restoration Fund grant to I-97 Sewer, LLC (St. John Properties) will help fund the design and construction of a connection to convey wastewater from the BWI Commerce Park, which now uses septic systems, through the Anne Arundel County wastewater system to the Baltimore City Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant has been upgraded to treat wastewater to Enhanced Nutrient Removal levels. The project also includes the abandonment and removal of the existing septic systems. This project will reduce the total nitrogen discharge to the groundwater by about 2,675 pounds per year. The project is part of the Maryland Department of the Environment’s efforts to connect failing septic systems to public sewers to reduce nutrient pollution and eliminate public health problems exacerbated by climate change.


International Trade Center Sewer Extension project – Anne Arundel County

A $1,197,564 Bay Restoration Fund grant to I-97 Sewer, LLC (St. John Properties) will help fund the design and construction of a connection to convey wastewater from the International Trade Center, which now uses septic systems, through the Anne Arundel County wastewater system to the Baltimore City Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant has been upgraded to treat wastewater to Enhanced Nutrient Removal levels. The project also includes the abandonment and removal of the existing septic systems. This project will reduce the total nitrogen discharge to the groundwater by about 2,650 pounds per year. The project is part of the Maryland Department of the Environment’s efforts to connect failing septic systems to public sewers to reduce nutrient pollution and eliminate public health problems exacerbated by climate change.


Trappe Well Addition project – Talbot County

Funding of $982,310 – a $491,155 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $491,155 grant in the form of forgiveness of a Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan – to the Town of Trappe will help fund the design and construction of a new water supply production well, well house, pump and other accessories. The town is served by two 50-year old wells that are strained and in danger of failing. The project will provide reliability and will allow the existing components to be taken offline for maintenance activities. This project will be constructed in accordance with coastal and non-coastal resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.


Upper Potomac River Commission Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Allegany County

A $100,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Upper Potomac River Commission will fund the planning for an Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrade of the Upper Potomac River Commission Wastewater Treatment Plant in Westernport. The plant had treated industrial wastewater from the Luke Paper Mill, which closed in 2019, along with a much smaller amount of municipal wastewater from Westernport, Luke, and other adjoining areas of Allegany County. A planning study will evaluate the upgrades for the plant conversion to a municipal wastewater treatment process. The ENR upgrade is necessary to reduce nutrients discharged to the North Branch Potomac River. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay restoration plan. This project will be constructed in accordance with coastal and non-coastal resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.


Vienna Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Dorchester County

A $23,475 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Town of Vienna will fund the planning for an Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrade of the Vienna Wastewater Treatment Plant. Vienna Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83% and its phosphorus discharge by 90%, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients to the Nanticoke River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay restoration plan. This project will be constructed in accordance with coastal and non-coastal resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.





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