Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

BALTIMORE (July 3, 2019) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $2 million in grants today to reduce pollution and improve water quality. The board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments to protect public health and prevent water pollution in Maryland communities and the Chesapeake Bay,” said Maryland Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles. “Connecting the Manchester Park community to public sewer service and upgrading the plant at the Cheltenham facility will help us to green and grow the state’s economy and lead in the race to protect and restore Chesapeake Bay watersheds.”

The following projects were approved today:

Construct CECO to Cherry Hill WWTP connection – Cecil County

A $2.85 million grant from the Water Quality State Revolving Fund to Cecil County will fund a multi-phase project to eliminate discharge permit violations and provide public sewer to the Manchester Park community to protect public health and safety. The grant is for the planning, design and construction of a wastewater conveyance system to serve the 123 homes in the subdivision and one business and partial repair of the existing sewer collection system. The conveyance system will pump sewage flow previously handled by CECO Utilities to the Cherry Hill Wastewater Treatment Plant. This project will be constructed in accordance with coastal and non-coastal resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.

Cheltenham Boys’ Village Youth Facility Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Prince George’s County

A $27,565 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Maryland Environmental Service will fund the planning phase of a project to design and build Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the 70,000 gallons-per-day wastewater treatment plant that serves the Cheltenham Youth Detention Center. After the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to Piscataway Creek and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s bay restoration plan. This project will be constructed in accordance with coastal and non-coastal resiliency guidelines developed as part of the Coast Smart Program to reduce climate change risks to such projects.

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