Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

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Jay Apperson
(410) 537-3003
jay.apperson@maryland.gov

Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve wastewater infrastructure 

BALTIMORE, MD (Oct. 29, 2014) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $173 million in funding today for projects to upgrade wastewater treatment plants, improve sewer infrastructure and restore and stabilize streams. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“Projects such as these are an important part of our effort to improve Maryland waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay,” said Governor O’Malley. “These projects reduce pollution and protect the environment and public health while creating jobs for more Marylanders.” 

The following funding was approved:

Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Baltimore County, Baltimore City 
Further funding totaling $146,259,867 – a $72,103,000 Water Quality State Revolving Loan and a $74,156,867 Bay Restoration Fund Grant, in addition to a previous $141,000,000 Bay Restoration Fund Grant, to Baltimore City will help fund the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project. The project entails the planning, design and construction of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the 180 million gallon per day Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 67 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to Back River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. The plant is currently achieving phosphorus discharge levels that are better than the Enhanced Nutrient Removalgoal. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

Gwynns Falls (Southern) Sewershed Improvements, Low Level Sewershed (Eastern) Sewer Improvements and Outfall Sewershed Sewer Improvements projects – Baltimore City
Loans totaling $21,724,000 from the Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund to Baltimore City will help fund the Gwynns Falls (Southern) Sewershed Improvements, Low Level Sewershed (Eastern) Sewer Improvements and Outfall Sewershed Sewer Improvements projects. The project entails planning, design, and construction of improvements to correct deficiencies in the sewersheds, including replacement and rehabilitation of sewers, improvements or upgrades to existing pump stations to reduce infiltration and inflow, point repairs to lines and manholes, disconnection of illegal connections and new sewers for additional capacity. This is a continuation of Baltimore City’s efforts to prevent sanitary sewer overflows as required by the Consent Decree initiated by the Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the City’s own initiatives on infrastructure rehabilitation. 

Taneytown Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Carroll County
A $4,986,494 Bay Restoration Fund Grant to the City of Taneytown will help fund the Taneytown Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project. The project entails the planning, pilot testing, design and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades at the 1.1 million gallon per day Taneytown Wastewater Treatment Plant.  After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 63 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Monocacy River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

West Boniwood Turn Drive Streambank Stabilization project– Prince George’s County 
A $159,800 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund Green Grant to Prince George’s County will help fund the West Boniwood Turn Drive Streambank Stabilization project. This project entails the stabilization of approximately 200 linear feet of severely eroded stream channel along Butler Branch Stream. The work includes construction of wood and rock weirs, installation of rip rap, planting of native trees and shrubs and implementation of other natural features.

The Pyles Drive Stream Stabilization project– Prince George’s County
A $145,900 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund Green Grant to Prince George’s County will help fund the Pyles Drive Stream Stabilization project. The project entails stabilization of approximately 600 linear feet of severely eroded stream channel. The work includes construction of wood and rock weirs, installation of rip rap, planting of native trees and shrubs and implementation of other natural features.
 
Kenny Road Stream Restoration project– Prince George’s County
A $92,000 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund Green Grant to Prince George’s County will help fund the Kenny Road Stream Restoration project. The project entails stabilization of approximately 124 linear feet of severely eroded stream channel with green infrastructure practices designated to restore or establish riparian buffers, bioengineered stream bank protection, steep pools in the stream and other natural features.

Regency Village Stream Restoration project– Prince George’s County 
A $70,000  Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund Green Grant to Prince George’s County will help fund the Regency Village Stream Restoration project. The project entails stabilization of approximately 140 linear feet of severely eroded stream channel. The work includes construction of step pools in the stream, installation of rip-rap, planting of native trees and shrubs and implementation of other natural features.  These improvements will restore and establish riparian buffers and control surface and subsurface hydrology to reduce erosion and sediments and nutrients in the stream.
 

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