Board of Public Works Approves Funding For Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Samantha Kappalman
samantha.kappalman@maryland.gov

Jay Apperson
jay.apperson@maryland.gov

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Board of Public Works Approves Funding For Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay
Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve wetlands  

BALTIMORE, MD (February 5, 2014) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $35 million in funding today to upgrade sewage treatment plants and septic systems, improve wetlands and reduce polluted stormwater runoff. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“Projects such as these are an important part of our effort to improve Maryland waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay,” said Governor O’Malley. “These projects reduce pollution and protect the environment and public health while creating jobs for more Marylanders.”

The following projects were approved today:

Northeast River Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Cecil County

Funding of $31,856,120 – a $10,977,120 Bay Restoration Fund grant and an estimated $20,879,000 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan – to Cecil County will help fund the multiple-phase planning, design and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the 2 million gallons per day Northeast River Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62.5 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Northeast River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

Queenstown Wastewater Treatment Plant Biological Nutrient Removal and Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Queen Anne’s County

Funding of $2,265,896 – an $880,929 Bay Restoration Fund grant and a $1,384,967 Chesapeake Water Quality Projects grant – to the Town of Queenstown will help fund the planning, design and construction of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrades and the expansion of the Queenstown Wastewater Treatment Plant from its existing capacity of 85,000 gallons per day to 180,000 gallons per day. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 90 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Lower Chester River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

Church Creek project – Anne Arundel County

A $508,900 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund green grant to the Chesapeake Bay Trust will help fund the Church Creek project. The project entails the creation of several acres of non-tidal wetlands to reduce erosion and sediment and nutrient pollution in Church Creek and South River.

Upgrade Septic Systems – Baltimore County

A $170,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Baltimore County will provide funding to upgrade on-site sewage disposal (septic) systems with best available technology to significantly reduce the discharge of nitrogen, one of the most serious pollutants in the Chesapeake Bay. The septics upgrade program is implemented by local jurisdictions. Counties will focus on upgrading septic systems located within the Critical Area. A typical septic system that does not remove nitrogen delivers about 23 pounds of nitrogen per year to the groundwater. An upgraded, nitrogen-removing septic system cuts a system’s nitrogen load at least in half.

Jones Falls Stream Corridor Enhancement at Mt. Vernon Mills project – Baltimore City

A $100,664 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund green grant to Terra Nova Ventures, LLC, will help fund the Jones Falls Stream Corridor Enhancement at Mt. Vernon Mills project. The project entails new management and treatment of on-site stormwater, restoration of riparian habitat and stream restoration techniques to reinstate the natural character of the water flow.

Twin Cities Wastewater Treatment Plant Biological Nutrient Removal and Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrades project – Dorchester County

A $50,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Town of Secretary will help fund the planning and design of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrades at the Twin Cities Wastewater Treatment Plant at an approved design capacity of 281,000 gallons per day. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 90 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Choptank River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

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