Board of Public Works Approves Funding For Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Samantha Kappalman
samantha.kappalman@maryland.gov

Jay Apperson
jay.apperson@maryland.gov

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS APPROVES FUNDING FOR CLEAN WATER AND THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve drinking water and wastewater infrastructure  

 

BALTIMORE, MD (January 8, 2014) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $2 million in funding today to operate and maintain sewage treatment plants that have been upgraded to remove additional pollution and to eliminate combined sewer overflows in one community while improving its water system. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“Projects such as these are an important part of our effort to improve Maryland waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay, and provide quality drinking water to our citizens,” said Governor O’Malley. “These projects reduce pollution and protect the environment and public health while creating jobs for more Marylanders.”

 

The following projects were approved today:

 

New operation and maintenance grants for upgraded sewage treatment plants – Statewide

Grants from the Bay Restoration Fund totaling $1,655,350 will provide funding for operation and maintenance costs for 18 wastewater treatment plants operating at enhanced nutrient removal levels. The Bay Restoration Fund provides for up to 10 percent of the annual revenue generated from wastewater treatment plant users and deposited with MDE to be allocated for such costs. The grant for each plant is up to $30,000 per million gallons per day of design capacity, with a minimum award of $30,000 and a maximum award of $300,000 per year for any plant.

Grants awarded were:

  • $300,000 to the City of Cumberland (Allegany County) for the Cumberland wastewater treatment plant
  • $300,000 to Charles County for the Mattawoman wastewater treatment plant
  • $240,000 to the City of Hagerstown (Washington County) for the Hagerstown wastewater treatment plant
  • $120,000 to Easton Utilities (Talbot County) for the Easton wastewater treatment plant
  • $100,000 to Howard County for the Little Patuxent wastewater treatment plant
  • $91,500 to the Town of Elkton (Cecil County) for the Elkton wastewater treatment plant
  • $90,000 to Queen Anne’s County for the Kent Island wastewater treatment plant
  • $68,250 to the City of Havre de Grace (Harford County) for the Havre de Grace wastewater treatment plant
  • $60,000 to Allegany County for the North Branch (Celanese) wastewater treatment plant
  • $49,500 to the Town of Hurlock (Dorchester County) for the Hurlock wastewater treatment plant
  • $44,100 to the City of Pocomoke City for the Pocomoke City wastewater treatment plant
  • $42,000 to the City of Brunswick (Frederick County) for the Brunswick wastewater treatment plant
  • $30,000 to Town of Chestertown (Kent County) for the Chestertown wastewater treatment plant
  • $30,000 to the Town of Federalsburg (Caroline County) for the Federalsburg wastewater treatment plant
  • $30,000 to the Town of Indian  Head (Charles County) for the Indian Head wastewater treatment plant
  • $30,000 to Talbot County for the Talbot Region II wastewater treatment plant
  • $20,000 to the Town of Denton (Caroline County) for the Denton wastewater treatment plant
  • $10,000 to the Town of Delmar (Wicomico County) for the Delmar wastewater treatment plant

 

Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades allow facilities to significantly reduce the amount of nutrients discharged to local waterways and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. The plants receving these grants have reduced nitrogen discharges by more than 1.5 million pounds per year and phosphorus discharges by more than 230,000 pounds per year. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

 

Railroad Avenue Combined Sewer Overflow Removal and Water Main Replacement Project – Caroline County

Funding of $595,000 – a $45,000 increase to a Water Supply Financial Assistance grant and a $550,000 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan – to the Town of Federalsburg, in addition to a previous $1,137,500 Supplemental Assistance Grant, a previous $225,536 Water Supply Financial Assistance grant, a previous $362,500 grant in the form of loan forgiveness from the Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund and previous $243,000 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan, will help fund the Railroad Avenue Combined Sewer Overflow Removal and Water Main Replacement Project. The project entails the design and construction of sanitary and stormwater sewer lines to separate the combined sanitary-stormwater sewer system, along with replacement of 2,240 feet of water main in the Railroad Avenue area in the Town of Federalsburg. The project is designed to eliminate sewer overflows and reduce peak flows at the Town’s wastewater treatment plant during storms. It will also replace an existing, aged and deteriorated water line.

 

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