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Maryland Emergency Management Agency


Summer Season Brings Possible Hurricane Dangers to Maryland

NOW IS THE TIME TO PREPARE: MAY 7-13 IS HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WEEK

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (May 8, 2017) — This week is Maryland Hurricane Preparedness Week and the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is teaming up with the National Weather Service (NWS) and local emergency managers to promote citizen awareness and preparedness.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June to November. The height of our season in Maryland typically is mid-August to October.  Hurricanes can cause strong winds, heavy rain, inland flooding and other severe weather. Residents in Maryland can “be weather ready” by ensuring that they know how to receive a warning, have a plan, and practice safety tips.

“Now is the time to start planning for hurricanes,” said Governor Larry Hogan. “Make sure you have an emergency plan, a disaster supply kit ready, and that your family, friends, and neighbors are prepared as well. If a storm is headed our way, the safest action is the simplest action – use common sense and stay safe.”

“We all saw the destruction in North Carolina and other states to our south after Hurricane Matthew last summer,” said MEMA Executive Director Russ Strickland. “Just a slight change in the path of that storm and Maryland could have been in the bull’s eye. Don’t wait until a storm is headed our way to prepare.”

The NWS notes Maryland can see hurricanes and impacts from a storm hundreds of miles away. “Damage to coastlines and destruction several hundred miles in-land can be seen with these tropical storms,” said NWS Warning Coordination Meteorologist Christopher Strong. “Hurricanes can produce 150-plus miles per hour winds, tornadoes and tremendous flooding from both tidal surges as well as torrential rain.”

The NWS and MEMA work closely together and with local government agencies to identify and monitor hurricane activity, develop preparedness plans and safety information and coordinate the response to these storms.

Residents can also take actions now to remain safe by taking the following actions:

  • Build an emergency supply kit and develop a family emergency and communications plan.
  • Stay tuned to trusted sources such as the National Weather Service and local broadcasters for official weather information.
  • Follow instructions and advice given by emergency officials, especially instructions related to evacuation.
  • During severe weather, stay indoors away from windows, close all interior doors, and brace external doors. If you live near the shore or coast, expect the storm tide will inundate your home.
  • Monitor NWS flood warnings for your area and be prepared to seek higher ground. Flooding is often our biggest threat.
  • If you live in a mobile home, plan to leave if high winds are a threat as they are unsafe in high winds.
  • Fill a bathtub or other large container with water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets.
  • Charge devices before bad weather hits and consider keeping a charger in your car.

In support of this, the U.S. Air Force and NOAA Hurricane Hunters, and the pilots that fly these aircraft into hurricanes for better forecasts, will be visiting our region at Reagan National Airport on Tuesday May 9th. More information on this exciting family event is here: http://www.weather.gov/baltimore/2017HATOverview

Additional information can be on MEMA’s website at mema.maryland.gov. Residents can also download the free MARYLAND Prepares mobile app at mema.maryland.gov/Pages/mdprepares.aspx.

 


Severe Weather Possible in Maryland This Afternoon and Evening

Residents Can Take Action to Prepare for Spring Storms

Listen to Press Relase here.

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (May 1, 2017) — The National Weather Service is forecasting possible severe thunderstorms throughout much of Maryland beginning this afternoon and evening. These storms bring the possibility of heavy rain, flooding, high winds, and even tornadoes—hazards that increase in likelihood during the spring season.

“Residents should constantly monitor weather forecasts and take action to prepare before severe weather begins,” said MEMA Executive Director Russ Strickland. “If a severe storm or tornado warning is issued, get indoors to a safe space, then, communicate with your neighbors, friends and family to make sure they’re aware of the situation.”

The following preparedness tips can help keep you and your family safe if a severe storm occurs in your area today or anytime this spring:

  • Charge your mobile devices in advance of a severe storm—these storms cause power outages and it is important to be able to communicate after a storm.
  • If a severe thunderstorm warning is issued or you are experiencing strong winds, get to a sturdy shelter and stay indoors away from windows.
  • Tornadoes can form rapidly in the right conditions. If there is a tornado warning or you see a tornado, quickly get inside and go to the lowest floor possible.
  • Know the difference between a tornado watch and warning.
    A watch means tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. A warning means residents need to take action because a tornado has been sighted or is indicated by radar.
  • Communicate with your neighbors, friends and family when severe storms are forecast. Following a strong storm or tornado, check in to make sure that they are safe.
  • If you are outside with no shelter when a tornado warning is issued, immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter.
  • Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from severe storms can cause fatalities and injuries.
    Follow MEMA on Twitter and Facebook for updates throughout the afternoon and evening.

Severe Weather Possible in Maryland This Afternoon and Evening

 Residents Can Take Action to Prepare for Spring Storms

 

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (May 1, 2017) — The National Weather Service is forecasting possible severe thunderstorms throughout much of Maryland beginning this afternoon and evening. These storms bring the possibility of heavy rain, flooding, high winds, and even tornadoes—hazards that increase in likelihood during the spring season.

“Residents should constantly monitor weather forecasts and take action to prepare before severe weather begins,” said MEMA Executive Director Russ Strickland. “If a severe storm or tornado warning is issued, get indoors to a safe space, then, communicate with your neighbors, friends and family to make sure they’re aware of the situation.”

The following preparedness tips can help keep you and your family safe if a severe storm occurs in your area today or anytime this spring:

  • Charge your mobile devices in advance of a severe storm—these storms cause power outages and it is important to be able to communicate after a storm.
  • If a severe thunderstorm warning is issued or you are experiencing strong winds, get to a sturdy shelter and stay indoors away from windows.
  • Tornadoes can form rapidly in the right conditions. If there is a tornado warning or you see a tornado, quickly get inside and go to the lowest floor possible.
  • Know the difference between a tornado watch and warning. A watch means tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. A warning means residents need to take action because a tornado has been sighted or is indicated by radar.
  • Communicate with your neighbors, friends and family when severe storms are forecast. Following a strong storm or tornado, check in to make sure that they are safe.
  • If you are outside with no shelter when a tornado warning is issued, immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter.
  • Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from severe storms can cause fatalities and injuries.

Follow MEMA on Twitter and Facebook for updates throughout the afternoon and evening.


Maryland Emergency Management Agency Partners with Nextdoor to Provide Emergency Preparedness Information and Notifications to Maryland Residents

Maryland Emergency Management Agency Partners with Nextdoor to Provide Emergency Preparedness Information and Notifications to Maryland Residents

MEMA Becomes First State Emergency Management Agency to Join Nextdoor, the Private Social Network for Neighborhoods

Listen to audio of release here.

4 people are holding a long green banner that says Nextdoor on it. The Maryland Emergency Management Agency logo is displayed in the background on a screen. The website nextdoor.Com is also displayed on a different screen behind the 4 people as well.

Pictured from left to right: MEMA Executive Director Russ Strickland, Nextdoor Senior City Strategist and Professional Neighbor Joseph Porcelli, MEMA Digital Engagement Coordinator Emily Allen, and Nextdoor Member Claire Corcoran.

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (April 20, 2017) — Earlier today, the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) announced a partnership with Nextdoor (nextdoor.com), the private social network for neighborhoods, to improve statewide and neighbor-to-neighbor communications before, during, and after emergencies.

MEMA will use Nextdoor to connect with neighbors by sharing news and updates and providing preparedness and alert information directly to communities. MEMA and Nextdoor neighborhoods will be able to work together to increase resiliency across Maryland.

“MEMA is the first State emergency management agency to join Nextdoor, and we are thrilled to have this additional tool to help us connect with Marylanders,” said MEMA Executive Director Russell Strickland. “Emergency situations require quick action. Nextdoor gives us the ability to target communications by geography, such as regions or flood zones, which will help us share timely information with those who need it.”

To date, Nextdoor has proven to be an essential and well-adopted tool for Maryland residents. More than 2,700 neighborhoods across Maryland are using Nextdoor to stay connected.
Maryland residents can create private neighborhood websites to share information, including neighborhood public safety issues, community events and activities, local services, and even lost pets with Nextdoor. MEMA will be able to post information, such as important news, preparedness information, and emergency notifications to communities across Maryland.

“We have always invested in innovative ways to increase safety for our residents,” Executive Director Strickland continued. “With Nextdoor, we can help empower neighbors to build community, which ultimately creates stronger, safer more resilient places to call home.”

Nextdoor is free for residents. Each Maryland neighborhood has its own private Nextdoor neighborhood website, accessible only to verified residents of that neighborhood. Neighborhoods establish and self-manage their own website and MEMA will not be able to access residents’ websites, contact information, or content. All members must verify that they live within the neighborhood before joining. Information shared on Nextdoor is password protected and cannot be accessed by Google or other search engines.

Residents interested in joining their neighborhood’s Nextdoor website can visit www.nextdoor.com and enter their address.

Maryland preparedness information can be accessed on the Maryland Emergency Management Agency’s website at mema.maryland.gov. You can also view the video of today’s announcement on MEMA’s Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/MDMEMA.


March 19-25 is Severe Storms Awareness Week

Spring Season Brings Chances for Hazardous Weather in Maryland

March 19-25 is Severe Storms Awareness Week

Snow may still be on the ground in many parts of Maryland, but now is the time to begin thinking about the upcoming severe storms season. Maryland Severe Storms Awareness Week begins Sunday, March 19, and the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is teaming up with the National Weather Service and local emergency managers to promote citizen awareness and preparedness.

During spring, Maryland is at risk for heavy rainstorms, flooding, damaging winds, tornadoes, hail and lightning. All of these hazards typically occur throughout the state; however, residents can “be weather prepared” by ensuring that they know how to receive warnings and practice safety tips.

“Spring is the time of year when we can experience dangerous thunderstorms, flooding, and even tornadoes,” said Governor Larry Hogan. “Maryland residents should follow the advice of local and state officials and use common sense when severe weather is in the forecast.”

The National Weather Service agrees with that assessment. “Maryland experiences severe storms regularly during the spring,” said NWS Warning Coordination Meteorologist Christopher Strong. “Our area is particularly at risk for damaging winds and flooding. We also see hailstorms and even tornadoes. In fact, Maryland has had nearly 100 tornadoes in the past 10 years.”

The National Weather Service and MEMA work closely together and with local emergency managers and other government agencies to identify and monitor severe weather systems, develop preparedness plans and safety information and coordinate the response to these storms.

“Severe Storms Awareness Week is a chance to think about the hazardous weather that regularly occurs in Maryland,” said Russ Strickland, Executive Director of MEMA. “Plan now for what you or your family should do in case of a severe weather alert or warning — get indoors to a safe space, then, communicate with your neighbors, friends and family to make sure they’re aware of the situation and are safe.”

Now is the time for residents to prepare for severe storms by taking the following actions:

  • During flooding, never enter an area where water is flowing over a road and you cannot see the pavement. Turn around, don’t drown!
  • If a severe thunderstorm warning is issued or you are experiencing strong winds, get to a sturdy shelter and stay indoors away from windows.
  • Tornadoes can form rapidly in the right conditions. If there is a tornado warning or you see a tornado, quickly get inside and go to the lowest floor possible.
  • If you hear thunder, you are close enough to be struck from a fringe lightning strike. More than 98% of lightning casualties are from people outdoors—get indoors or inside your vehicle if possible.

Additional information can be found on the “Weather Ready” website at weather.gov/lwx/weatherready and the MEMA website at mema.maryland.gov.


Governor Larry Hogan Signs Executive Order Declaring State of Emergency in Maryland in Anticipation of Snowstorm

Click here to read the entire Executive Order declaring a State of Emergency.


What does a “State of Emergency” mean?

What does a “State of Emergency” mean?

In preparation for the upcoming snow fall, Governor Larry Hogan has asked State agencies to launch a coordinated effort to keep Marylanders safe and informed in the upcoming days. Governor Hogan today signed an Executive Order declaring a state of emergency in Maryland, beginning Monday, March 13 at 9:00 PM, in response to the winter storm which could bring significant amounts of snow to areas across the state. Here is information on what a state of emergency means.

Not all states of emergency are the same. Each state of emergency is different and can change depending on the severity of the event or emergency.  Be sure to check with your local news and with MEMA for updated information related to states of emergency. 

A state of emergency is declared in order to allow Maryland to coordinate and request emergency resources and support. A state of emergency allows the Governor to access certain resources, like the National Guard, in order to increase the State’s response.

A state of emergency is a good indicator that residents should remain alert and follow officials’ orders, news stations, and weather forecasts in order to be informed of the situation. In this particular case, residents are being advised that they should prepare for a significant winter storm and that motorists should avoid nonessential travel after the snow begins to fall. Here is additional information about this state of emergency:

 

Will schools be closed?

States of Emergencies typically do not mandate school closures. It usually is the local school district’s decision to stay open or to close.

Will stores and businesses be open?

This state of emergency does not require employers to close. We ask that all employers consider employee safety at all times.

Can I drive on the roads?

Motorists are not prohibited from driving on the roads at this time. Use common sense–if you must drive and cannot change your plans, please do so carefully.  Give yourself extra time to get to your destination.  Let family or friends know your route and expected arrival time.

Click here to read Governor Hogan’s Press Release


Maryland Bracing for Winter Storm Beginning Late Monday

Maryland Bracing for Winter Storm Beginning Late Monday

Residents Should Be Aware of Potential Significant Snowfall

And Take Actions to Stay Safe

Listen to audio of release here.

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (March 12, 2017) — Maryland agencies are gearing up for a late-season storm expected to bring significant snowfall to much of central, northern and western Maryland starting Monday night into Tuesday. Residents should make preparations now. The Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) advises all residents in and around these areas to follow weather forecasts as they are updated.

“Don’t let the recent mild weather fool you – it’s still winter and this storm is coming,” said Governor Larry Hogan. “Marylanders should prepare for the storm and make plans to check on vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors when the bad weather hits. Use common sense and don’t drive during the storm.”

MEMA has been monitoring forecasts for several days and coordinating with the National Weather Service, local emergency managers and partner agencies.  There is still some uncertainty about the exact timing and track of the storm, which is expected to affect the Atlantic coast from the middle-Atlantic states through New England. Maryland residents should continue to check updated information as it becomes available and prepare for this storm now.

”The mild weather over the last several weeks may have lulled us into complacency,” said Russell Strickland, Executive Director of the Maryland Emergency Management Agency. “Make sure your car is ready for winter travel, stock up on vital food and household supplies in case travel is difficult for several days, and make sure to keep devices charged so you can follow reliable weather forecasts and information from emergency officials.”

Motorists are urged to stay off the roads during the height of the storm so crews can more easily clear highways. Driving could be dangerous soon after the snow begins. Additionally, residents should take the following actions:

· Closely monitor updated weather forecasts and keep electronic communications devices charged.

· Be cautious shoveling snow or ice to avoid overexertion. Take frequent breaks and keep hydrated.

· If you must travel, make sure to have car chargers, kitty litter or sand for traction. Let friends or family know of your travel route and expected arrival time.

· If it is safe to do so, consider clearing off roofs if significant snow has accumulated.

· Know who to contact in the case of a power outage. Emergency phone numbers for utility companies can be found here: http://mema.maryland.gov/Pages/PowerOutages.aspx

Traffic, weather and power outage alerts, as well as winter preparedness information, can be accessed on the Maryland Emergency Management Agency’s website at mema.maryland.gov. You can also follow MEMA on Twitter @MDMEMA or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MDMEMA for updated information.


Auxiliary Communications Service Activated for Presidential Inauguration

Auxiliary Communications Service Activated for Presidential Inauguration

Aux Comms Radio Operator (RADO) Douglas P. Lindsey monitors WebEOC for updates on the Inaugural event. Douglas is sitting down in front of a computer with a pen in his hand writing information. The picture is taken from behind him.

Aux Comms Radio Operator (RADO) Douglas P. Lindsey monitors WebEOC for updates on the Inaugural event.

The Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS) was activated during the Presidential Inauguration January 20, 2017. This program established voice and digital links with Prince George’s, Montgomery and Anne Arundel Counties.

The ACS is an operational concept involving Federal Communications Commission-licensed amateur radio operators under the auspices of the Maryland Joint Operations Center (MJOC).  Located within the MJOC, the ACS is the modern evolution of the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES).  ACS allows interoperability among multiple communications resources.

Many ACS personnel hold Federal Emergency Management Agency certifications.  Some operators are also authorized to operate Military Auxiliary Radio Systems stations, as well as participate directly in SHARES operations.  Operators bring years of valuable operating and technical expertise, and add to the capability of MEMA to gather localized information.

The ACS concept clearly demonstrated a comprehensive ability to provide both communications flexibility and proficiency, while using minimal MEMA resources in conjunction with a volunteer staff.  Their ability to collect and disseminate targeted information, without disrupting or distracting other responders and communicators, makes ACS a force multiplier for emergency management in Maryland.


MEMA Monitoring Snowstorm Expected to Hit Eastern Shore, Southern Maryland on Saturday (1/7/2017)

MEMA Monitoring Snowstorm Expected to Hit Eastern Shore, Southern Maryland on Saturday

Residents Should Be Aware and Take Appropriate Actions to Stay Safe

Listen to audio of this release here.

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (January 6, 2017) — A winter storm will move up the East Coast and affect Maryland early Saturday morning, bringing with it accumulating snow, wind gusts and frigid temperatures. The National Weather Service has issued Winter Storm Watches and Warnings for portions of the lower Eastern Shore and southern Maryland. These areas could see significant snowfall, which will begin after midnight on Friday and into Saturday. The Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) advises all residents in and around these areas to follow weather forecasts as they are updated. In addition to snow, the majority of the State will have frigid temperatures.

MEMA is closely monitoring the storm and is coordinating preparedness and response efforts with local emergency management officials. Residents in different areas of Maryland may feel different effects from this weather system.

“Marylanders on the Eastern Shore and in Southern Maryland should stay off the roads during the storm,” said MEMA Executive Director Russell Strickland. “In other parts of Maryland, the winds could create the coldest wind chill of the season and increase the possibility of downed power lines. Please remain safe and remember to check on vulnerable family, friends and neighbors.”

Additionally, Maryland residents in affected areas should consider taking the following actions:

  • Closely monitor updated weather forecasts and keep electronic communications devices charged.
  • Be cautious shoveling snow or ice to avoid overexertion. Take frequent breaks and keep hydrated.
  • If you must travel, make sure to have car chargers, kitty litter or sand for traction. Let friends or family know of your travel route and expected arrival time.
  • Never run generators indoors or in closed areas.
  • If it is safe to do so, consider clearing off roofs if significant snow has accumulated.
  • Know who to contact in the case of a power outage. Emergency phone numbers for utility companies can be found here: http://mema.maryland.gov/Pages/PowerOutages.aspx

Traffic, weather and power outage alerts, as well as winter preparedness information, can be accessed on the Maryland Emergency Management Agency’s website at mema.maryland.gov. You can also follow MEMA on Twitter @MDMEMA or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MDMEMA for updated information.


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