Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

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Jay Apperson

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Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve drinking water reliability, reduce energy consumption

BALTIMORE, MD (February 7, 2018) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $316 million in grants and loans today to reduce pollution, improve water quality and save energy and money. The board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments to protect public health and prevent water pollution in Maryland communities and the Chesapeake Bay,” said Maryland Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles. “We are providing major funding to Baltimore City and Baltimore County for the Back River treatment plant’s headworks project. This is one of the most important steps we can take to prevent sewage in the streets and basements and ensure compliance with our clean water laws. Environmental infrastructure and energy efficiency save money, reduce pollution and help us to green and grow the state’s economy.”

The following projects were approved today:

 

Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant Headworks Improvement and Wet Weather Flow Equalization project – Baltimore City and Baltimore County

Funding of up $304.4 million – a $155,717,765 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan and a $1.5 million grant in the form of loan forgiveness to Baltimore City and a $145.7 million Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan and a $1.5 million grant in the form of loan forgiveness to Baltimore County – will help fund a new “headworks” facility at Baltimore City’s Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant. This contract, the second of two, includes construction of a new pump station, emergency storage tanks, odor control system and other related work. The overall project will provide wet weather storage to protect the plant treatment processes and relieve restrictions to reduce sewage backups and overflows. This project is part of Baltimore City’s sewer improvements as required by a consent decree initiated by the Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Great Mills Wastewater Pumping Station Replacement project – St. Mary’s County

A $5,292,504 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan to the St. Mary’s County Metropolitan Commission will fund the Great Mills Wastewater Pumping Station Replacement project. The project involves the replacement of the Great Mills Wastewater Pumping Station, which lacks the capacity to handle the projected growth within its service area. Because the site of the existing station is too small for an upgraded facility, a new station will be built near the intersection of Maryland Routes 5 and 471.

 

Greensboro-Goldsboro Regional Wastewater project – Caroline County

A $2.52 million Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Town of Greensboro will help fund the fifth phase of the Greensboro-Goldsboro Regional Wastewater project. The project will eliminate groundwater contamination from leaking septic systems by abandoning existing septic systems and replacing them with pumps and lines to carry sewage to the new Enhanced Nutrient Removal Greensboro Wastewater Treatment Plant. Earlier phases of the project included construction of the Greensboro Wastewater Treatment Plant and the system to send sewage from Goldsboro to the plant.

 

Conococheague Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Refinement project – Washington County

Funding of $1,849,660 – a $1,387,245 Water Quality State Revolving Loan fund loan and a $462,415 grant in the form of loan forgiveness to Washington County – will help fund the planning, design and construction of an Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrade and expansion of the Conochocheague Wastewater Treatment Plant from 4.1 million gallons per day to 4.5 million gallons per day. A $19,271,609 Bay Restoration Fund grant in 2016 funded the ENR upgrade. With the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62.5 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Upper Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

 

Energy Saving Improvements at Clarke Avenue Pump Station project – Worcester County

A $1 million Energy Water Infrastructure Program grant to Pocomoke City will help fund the Energy Saving Improvements at Clarke Avenue Pump Station project. The project includes upgrades to pumps at the plant to reduce energy consumption.

 

Braddock Run Sanitary Sewer Phase VI project – Allegany County

Funding of $999,282 – a $499,641 Water Quality State Revolving Loan fund loan and a $499,641 grant in the form of loan forgiveness to Allegany County – will help fund a multi-phase project to replace or rehabilitate the aging and deteriorated sanitary sewer system in several areas of the Braddock Run Sanitary Sewer District, including areas within Allegany County, the City of Frostburg and Frostburg State University. The project is designed to reduce sewer overflows.

 

North Dorchester High School and North Dorchester Middle School Well and Storage Tank Replacement project – Dorchester County

A $215,000 Water Supply Financial Assistance grant to the Dorchester County Board of Education will help fund the North Dorchester High School and North Dorchester Middle School Well and Storage Tank Replacement project. Both schools are serviced by a single well and pump with insufficient water supply and pressure. The project will provide potable water to about 1,500 students and faculty.

 

Pine Street Pump Station Energy Reduction project – Wicomico County

A $149,500 Energy Water Infrastructure Program grant to the Town of Delmar will help fund the Pine Street Pump Station Energy Reduction project. The project includes upgrades to pumps at the plant to reduce energy consumption.

 

Elk Neck State Park Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Cecil County

An $80,683 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Maryland Environmental Services will fund the planning of an Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrade at the 60,000 gallons per day Elk Neck State Park Wastewater Treatment Plant. Upon completion of the upgade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to Elk River and the Chesapeake Bay.

 

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