Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water, Energy and Chesapeake Bay Progress

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Jay Apperson

(410) 537-3003
jay.apperson@maryland.gov

Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water, Energy and Chesapeake Bay Progress

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve infrastructure, save energy

Baltimore, MD (May 10, 2017) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $148 million in grants and loans today to  reduce pollution, improve water quality and save energy and money. The board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments to protect public health, prevent pollution and save money and energy in Maryland communities and the Chesapeake Bay. The Maryland Department of the Environment thanks Governor Hogan for his leadership on these priorities, including first-time funding under the new energy-water infrastructure program,” said Maryland Secretary of the Environment Ben Grumbles. “Protecting clean drinking water in Baltimore City and Baltimore County, upgrading the sewage treatment plant in Oxford, making the connection between water and clean energy by going solar at the Easton sewage treatment plant and saving energy at Anne Arundel plants will help us to green and grow the state’s economy and lead in the race to protect and restore Chesapeake Bay watersheds.”

The following projects were approved today:
 

Druid Lake Finished Water Tanks and Ashburton Reservoir Zone 2 tanks projects – Baltimore City, Baltimore County

More than $135 million in grants and loans will help fund the design and construction of finished water storage tanks with a capacity of about 54 million gallons to replace the open-air reservoir at Druid Park. The project is necessary under a settlement agreement between the Maryland Department of the Environment and the City of Baltimore to comply with a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule designed to improve drinking water quality and provide additional protection from contaminants. The cost of the project is shared by Baltimore City and Baltimore County because the two jurisdictions share use of the drinking water system. The board approved funding of $86,509,380 to Baltimore City in the form of a $40,279,780 Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund loan and a $1.5 million grant in the form of loan forgiveness from the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund. The board approved funding of $49,451,819 to Baltimore County in the form of a $22,951,819 Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund loan and a $1.5 million grant in the form of loan forgiveness from the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund.

Town of Oxford Wastewater Treatment Plant Biological Nutrient Removal and Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Talbot County

Funding of $7,728,889 – a $2,989,477 Bay Restoration Fund grant and a $4,739,412 Biological Nutrient Removal program grant — to the Town of Oxford will help fund the planning, design and construction of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrades at the Town of Oxford Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats 150,000 gallons a day. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 90 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Lower Choptank River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

 

Easton Wastewater Treatment Plant Photo Voltaic Array project – Talbot County

A $3 million Energy Water Infrastructure Program grant to the Easton Utilities Commission will help fund the construction of a solar power system at the Easton Wastewater Treatment Plant. The system is designed to meet the plant’s energy demands with the generation of nearly threemillion kilowatt hours per year of renewable energy.

 

Mayo Water Reclamation Facility Biological Nutrient Removal and Enhanced Nutrient Removal through Annapolis Water Reclamation Facility project – Anne Arundel County
A $1,260,588 Biological Nutrient Removal program grant to Anne Arundel County will help fund the Mayo Water Reclamation Facility Biological Nutrient Removal and Enhanced Nutrient Removal through Annapolis Water Reclamation Facility project. This project involves the construction of a wastewater pumping station and about 25,500 linear feet of force main and gravity sewer to convey 820,000 gallons per day of wastewater from the Mayo Water Reclamation Facility to the Annapolis Water Reclamation Facility for BNR/ENR treatment and discharge. Upon completion of this project, the Mayo facility will be decommissioned and the discharge point eliminated to avoid the long term effect on the Bay and shellfish harvesting waters. The project was determined to be the most cost-effective alternative to achieving ENR goals at the Mayo facility, as required by Maryland’s Watershed Implementation Plan. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay restoration plan.

Energy Efficient Belt Filter Presses project – Anne Arundel County
A $1 million Energy Water Infrastructure Program grant to Anne Arundel County will help fund the purchase of high-efficiency presses for solids and sludge dewatering at the Annapolis, Broadneck and Patuxent wastewater treatment plants. Use of the presses is expected to reduce electricity consumption by 51 percent.

###

 

PW-WEB02