Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Jay Apperson

(410) 537-3003
jay.apperson@maryland.gov

Board of Public Works approves funding for clean water and the Chesapeake Bay

Grant and loans will reduce pollution, improve water quality, reduce emissions

Baltimore, MD (February 10, 2016) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $60 million in funding today to improve water quality and energy efficiency at the Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments and great news for Maryland communities and citizens of the Chesapeake Bay region,” Governor Hogan said. “This funding will boost the restoration and cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay and support an innovative upgrade to the Blue Plains sewage treatment plant to increase energy efficiency and reduce air emissions.”

Maryland Secretary of the Environment Ben Grumbles said: “The combined heat and power project is a great example of energy and water infrastructure investments the Department of the Environment and Maryland Energy Administration are pursuing, such as the $16.2 million in the energy-water infrastructure program included in the Governor’s budget.”

The Board of Public Works also approved funding to reduce sewer overflows in Western Maryland. Secretary Grumbles noted that that funding will help to green and grow the state’s economy and protect and restore Chesapeake Bay watersheds.

The following projects were approved today:

Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission

Funding of $53,823,568 in the form of a Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund loan to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission will help fund the planning, design and construction of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrades at the 370 million gallons per day Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant in Washington. The plant is currently achieving phosphorus discharge levels that are better than the Enhanced Nutrient Removal goal. After the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83.3 percent, significantly reducing the nutrients discharged to Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan. The funding is for the Maryland portion of the facility, which treats about 170 million gallons of wastewater per day from Montgomery and Prince George’s counties.

 

Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant New Digestion Facilities, Combined Heat and Power project – Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission

An $8,169,077 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund Green Loan to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission will help fund the design and construction of the Combined Heat and Power System with New Digestion Facilities project at the 370 million gallons per day Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant. The combined heat and power System will generate electricity from the digester gas for plant usage and produce steam to heat the new digestion process, providing an estimated 40 percent of the plant’s demand. The project will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 130,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent a year. The funding is for the Maryland portion of the facility, which treats about 170 million gallons of wastewater per day from Montgomery and Prince George’s counties.

Combined Sewer Overflow Elimination Phase VIII-A Grant Street project – City of Frostburg

A $1,038,313 Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Project Funds Supplemental Assistance Program grant to the City of Frostburg will help fund the planning, design and construction of the proposed improvements to the Grant Street Connector, the final phase of the Frostburg Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Elimination Priority Project. Improvements to this connector will significantly reduce flows to the George’s Creek Pumping Station, the LaVale Pumping Station and ultimately to the Cumberland sewerage treatment plant to prevent sewer overflows.

 

# # #

PW-WEB02