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Environmental Stewards Graduate from Maryland Conservation Corps

Ten-Month Program Includes Work with the Maryland Park Service

Thirty-two students comprise the Maryland Conservation Corps Class of 2017The Maryland Department of Natural Resources honored 32 members of the 2016-2017 Maryland Conservation Corps Thursday during their graduation program. The ceremony at the Wye Island Natural Resource Management Area in Queen Anne’s County capped the students’ completion of 1,700 hours of work with the Maryland Park Service.

Maryland Conservation Corps members help students plant treesThe graduates, ranging in age from 17 to 25 years old, were from Maryland and other states, including Florida, New York and Pennsylvania. Members were assigned to crews at individual state parks like Assateague, Gunpowder and Patapsco, and spent the majority of their time learning conservation skills while teaching environmental stewardship and conducting educational programs for park visitors of all ages.
Maryland Corps members worked to improve more than 2,000 acres of park and public land around the state. Corps members worked to improve more than 2,000 acres of park and public land around the state. They also helped to maintain Maryland’s vast coastline to mitigate erosion, contributing to the overall health of state waterways.
Maryland Conservation Corps students helped to maintain Maryland's vast coastline to mitigate erosion, contributing to the overall health of state waterways.Managed by the Maryland Park Service since 1984, the Maryland Conservation Corps is an award-winning AmeriCorps program that provides members with opportunities for skill development and personal growth through a supportive, team-based environment, emphasizing the satisfaction of completing projects that benefit Maryland’s natural resources.

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