Skip to Main Content

Newsroom

Governor Larry Hogan Kicks Off Walbrook Mill Redevelopment at Project C.O.R.E. Celebration

Governor Larry Hogan Kicks Off Walbrook Mill Redevelopment at Project C.O.R.E. Celebration
Redevelopment Will Bring Affordable Housing, Retail Space to North Avenue Corridor

Governor Larry Hogan personally kicked off the demolition of Walbrook Mill as part of a Project C.O.R.E. celebration in Baltimore.

Governor Larry Hogan personally kicked off the demolition of Walbrook Mill as part of a Project C.O.R.E. celebration in Baltimore.

ANNAPOLIS, MD (October 26, 2017) – Governor Larry Hogan today kicked off the redevelopment of Walbrook Mill in West Baltimore through Project C.O.R.E., and celebrated the recent milestone of more than 1,000 units of blight removed through the initiative. Project C.O.R.E., or Creating Opportunities for Renewal and Enterprise, is a multi-year city-state partnership to demolish vacant and derelict buildings in Baltimore and replace them with green space or redevelopment. The governor was joined by Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Kenneth C. Holt, City Councilman Leon Pinkett, Coppin State University President Maria Thompson, Coppin Heights Community Development Corporation (CDC) President John Bullock, and Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore (NHS) Executive Director Dan Ellis, as well as numerous local elected officials and members of the community.

“Just a few weeks ago, we surpassed the historic milestone of 1,000 units of blighted properties being removed,” said Governor Hogan. “A total of 1,154 decaying units, many without roofs or walls, have been demolished, and another 32 have been stabilized for reuse.

“Today, we are continuing that incredible success here at Walbrook Lumberyard, which – thanks to Project C.O.R.E. – will be transformed into a community hub that the residents of West Baltimore, the students, and staff at Coppin State University, and all Marylanders can be proud of.”

“The Walbrook Mill project is a prime opportunity to turn distressed properties along the North Avenue Corridor near Coppin State University into much-needed affordable and market rate housing, as well as retail and industrial space for workforce development,” said Mayor Catherine E. Pugh. “Thanks to Project C.O.R.E. demolition funds, developers can take their redevelopment projects from concept to reality as part of ongoing efforts to revitalize and strengthen Baltimore neighborhoods.”

“Under Governor Hogan’s leadership, we are creating new opportunities in areas that have seen significant disinvestment,” said Secretary Holt. “In a very short amount of time, Project C.O.R.E. has brought together public-private partnership at a level never before seen in Baltimore.”

Walbrook Mill, a five-acre abandoned lumber yard in close proximity to Coppin State University, will be redeveloped in phases, beginning with today’s demolition of a blighted warehouse building. Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore, partnering with Coppin Heights Community Development Corporation and Osprey Property Company, has received Project C.O.R.E. funding to prepare the site for the redevelopment. The plan for the site, at full build out, is to include approximately 140 affordable and market rate rental apartments and townhomes, 9,000 square feet of North Ave commercial and retail space, and includes the rehabilitation and reuse of approximately 32,000 square feet of existing lumber warehouse space to be dedicated to workforce development opportunities.

“As a Councilman representing West Baltimore as well as Chair of the Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, this is truly an auspicious occasion,” said John Bullock, President of the Coppin Heights Community Development Corporation. “Removing blight and infusing mixed income housing along with retail reflects the possibilities in previously neglected neighborhoods. The vision of Coppin Heights CDC is now coming to fruition and we look forward to replicating this model to spur vital community development.”

“NHS Baltimore is proud to partner with the Coppin Heights CDC, Osprey Property Company, and the community in the redevelopment of the former Walbrook Mill lumberyard,” said Dan Ellis, Executive Director of the Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore. “By working together with each partner bringing unique strengths to the project, transformative work for the benefit of community residents occurs. Support from Governor Hogan through Project C.O.R.E. has allowed this project to become reality.”

In addition to the kickoff of the Walbrook Mill project and celebrating the milestone of 1,000 blighted properties removed, Governor Hogan highlighted Project C.O.R.E.’s Fiscal Year 18 awardees, which includes 24 projects receiving nearly $15 million for demolition and redevelopment that will leverage approximately $269 million in additional private and nonprofit sector development. Projects include renovations to the historic Hoen Lithograph building, the removal of a vacant industrial laundry building to make way for the Mary Harvin Health and Wellness Center, and the stabilization of rowhomes across the street from the Western District Police Station. In total, Project C.O.R.E. has awarded more than $33 million for 65 projects, leveraging $570 million in nonprofit and private sector investments.

For more information about Project C.O.R.E., visit: http://dhcd.maryland.gov/ProjectCORE.

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT: Sara Luell, Director of Communications, sara.luell@maryland.gov, 301-429-7803



Second Year of Montgomery Homeownership Program to Assist Qualified Homebuyers in the County is Announced

Second Year of Montgomery Homeownership Program to Assist Qualified Homebuyers in the County is Announced

NEW CARROLLTON, MD (October 25, 2017) – Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Kenneth C. Holt and Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett today announced a renewal of the Montgomery Homeownership Program through the Maryland Mortgage Program. This joint initiative helps qualified applicants purchase a home by offering a zero-interest loan for down payment or closing cost assistance. Montgomery County has committed one million dollars to this program in FY18. The program will run during FY18, until funds are expended.

“We are helping qualified buyers purchase a home in Montgomery County by providing significant assistance for down payment and closing costs,” said County Executive Leggett. “By doing this in partnership with the State of Maryland, our new homeowners can receive additional support to buy a home.”

The Montgomery Homeownership Program leverages the Maryland Mortgage Program and is administered by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, which provides similar down payment assistance across the state.

“Even if a homebuyer has qualified for a mortgage loan, down payment and closing costs can sometimes be a barrier that delays them from buying a home,” said Secretary Holt. “Our hope is that this partnership will remove that barrier and empower more Montgomery County residents to purchase their first home.”

The down payment assistance program will be available for buyers with qualified incomes to purchase a Montgomery County home as their primary residence. The program is part of Montgomery County’s ongoing efforts to promote affordable and inclusive housing opportunities. It is managed on a first-come, first-served basis.

Program incentives include:

  • A zero-interest loan provided by Montgomery County equal to 40 percent of household income, up to $25,000 for down payment or closing cost assistance
  • 30-year fixed-rate financing on a first mortgage through an MMP-approved lender
  • Tax credit savings available through the Maryland HomeCredit Program
  • Streamlined and straightforward home buying and financing experience

Potential homebuyers are subject to household income limits and must meet standard qualifications under the Maryland Mortgage program, including completion of homebuyer education. The Maryland Mortgage program is the state’s flagship homeownership program, providing fixed-rate mortgages, primarily to first-time homebuyers, along with down payment and closing cost incentives.

For more information or to apply, visit Montgomery Homeownership Program at:
http://mmp.maryland.gov/Montgomery/Pages/MontgomeryHomeownershipProgramII.aspx

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT: Sara Luell, Director of Communications, sara.luell@maryland.gov, 301-429-7803



Lead poisoning in Maryland drops to lowest recorded level, testing increases in first year of state initiative

Lead poisoning in Maryland drops to lowest recorded level, testing increases in first year of state initiative

Governor Larry Hogan proclaims Lead Poisoning Prevention Week in Maryland

Baltimore, MD (October 25, 2017) – Childhood lead poisoning cases in Maryland decreased last year to the lowest levels since data has been collected in connection with the state’s 1994 lead law, according to a 2016 Childhood Blood Lead Surveillance report released today by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE). Additionally, blood lead testing rates increased across Maryland in the first year of the state’s initiative to test all children at ages 1 and 2. MDE continues to work with the Department of Health (Health) and the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), as well as local partners, to prevent childhood lead poisoning in Maryland.

For the first time, the report also tracks potential sources of lead exposure in reported cases of childhood lead poisoning and finds that many young children with elevated blood lead levels may have been exposed to lead from sources other than deteriorated lead-based paint.

The report follows Governor Larry Hogan’s announcement earlier this year that the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved an application by the Maryland Department of Health to launch a $7.2 million initiative to reduce lead poisoning and improve asthma, two conditions related to environmental conditions in housing. The Department of Health, in collaboration with the MDE and the DHCD, will implement the initiative. Governor Hogan also proclaimed this week as Lead Poisoning Prevention Week in Maryland.

Blood lead testing rates and a new initiative

Blood lead testing rates increased across the state in 2016. Maryland’s new initiative to test all children at ages 1 and 2, regardless of where they live, was announced by the Hogan administration in October 2015 in response to data showing that the state could improve its testing and identification of children with lead exposure.

Although the new Department of Health regulations for increased testing were in effect for only nine months in 2016, starting in March of that year, the 2016 Childhood Blood Lead Surveillance report shows that the number of children age 1 or 2 tested for blood lead in Maryland was 12.2 percent higher than the comparable average for the prior six years. Most counties experienced increases in testing rates, with the largest increases in Howard, Frederick and Carroll counties, each of which saw rates in 2016 increase by more than half. Harford, Queen Anne’s, and Calvert counties also saw increases from 25 to 50 percent.

The report attributes the increase in testing of young children to the universal blood lead testing initiative for 1- and 2-year-olds and to another Maryland Department of Health initiative to endorse Point of Care testing for lead, which allows healthcare providers to test children and provide results in the same office visit. This simplifies testing for parents and, in most cases, eliminates any further office visits or testing for lead.

Childhood lead poisoning cases and Maryland’s lead law

Even with the increase in blood lead testing, the report shows that the percentage of tested young children in Maryland with blood levels at or above the level that triggers action under state law decreased compared to the prior year. This is the lowest level since the beginning of such data collection in 1993.

Last year, less than 0.3 percent of Maryland children tested had an elevated blood lead level that equaled or exceeded the state law-defined elevated level of 10 micrograms per deciliter. The comparable figure for Baltimore City also decreased to the lowest levels since the beginning of data collection, to 1 percent. The report’s findings represent a decrease since 1993 of more than 98 percent in the number of young children reported to have lead poisoning. Much of the decline in blood lead levels is the result of implementation and enforcement of Maryland’s 1994 Reduction of Lead Risk in Housing Act.

The report also shows a decline in the percentage of tested children with blood lead levels below the state-law-defined elevated level, but still of concern based on guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The number of Maryland children identified with blood lead levels of 5-9 micrograms per deciliter decreased from 1,789 in 2015 to 1,729 in 2016. MDE and the Baltimore City Health Department coordinate to investigate pre-1978 rental units in the city where children with test results of 5-9 micrograms per deciliter live.

MDE serves as the coordinating agency for statewide efforts to eliminate childhood lead poisoning. In addition to the new lead testing plan, under the Hogan administration, Maryland has moved to protect more children from the health risks associated with lead paint poisoning by enforcing an expansion of the type of rental housing covered by the state’s lead law.

Tracking potential sources

In 2016, MDE began comprehensively tracking potential sources of childhood lead exposure. While exposure to lead paint hazards continues to affect children across Maryland, exposure from other sources has been observed, the report states.

For example, 20 of 35 confirmed cases in Prince George’s County were children of refugee families who had relocated to the United States and recently settled in that county, the report finds. Also, cosmetics, such as kohl, and spices purchased outside the United States were identified as potential health hazards during investigations of a significant number of cases across Maryland.

DHCD’s Lead Hazard Reduction Program

The Special Loans Program of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development continues to make a significant impact on the lead exposure from lead-based paint in pre-1978 housing stock statewide. The Lead Hazard Reduction Loan and Grant Program was established by the Maryland General Assembly in 1986 solely for the purpose to extend loans and grants to eligible individuals, child care centers, and sponsors to finance the lead hazard reduction of residential housing units. In Fiscal Year 2017, the program helped abate lead in 114 homes for $1,776,139. In addition, the department’s energy programs utilized abatement-related activities on 37 homes for $75,000.

Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids Lead Initiative gets approval

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved an application by the Maryland Department of Health to launch a $4.17 million initiative to reduce lead poison conditions through the abatement of lead and other lead-related repairs in housing.

The initiative leverages federal funds available through the Maryland Children’s Health Program under the authority of a Health Services Initiative State Plan Amendment. The Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids Program will receive $4.17 million in funding, using a combination of $3.67 million in CHIP federal matching funds and $500,000 in State fiscal year 2018 funds. Eligibility requirements for the initiative are as follows: a child who has a lead test result of 5 mg/dl; 18 years or younger, lives in or visits in the home or apartment for 10 hours or more a week; and are currently eligible or enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP.

DHCD will administer the initiative through a network of nonprofits, local agencies, and contractors to help complete the projects. The local health boards and primary care physicians will assist in referring the impacted families to the program to get the much-needed repairs completed.

More information

Childhood lead poisoning is a completely preventable disease.

Exposure to lead is the most significant and widespread environmental hazard for children in Maryland. Children are at the greatest risk from birth to age 6 while their neurological systems are developing. Exposure to lead can cause long-term neurological damage that may be associated with learning and behavioral problems and with decreased intelligence.

Maryland’s lead law requires owners of pre-1978 rental dwelling units to register their properties and reduce the potential for children’s exposure to lead paint hazards by performing specific lead risk reduction treatments prior to each change in tenancy.

Under the Maryland lead law, the Department of the Environment: assures compliance with mandatory requirements for lead risk reduction in rental units built before 1978; maintains a statewide listing of registered and inspected units; and provides blood lead surveillance through a registry of test results of all children tested in Maryland. The lead program also: oversees case management follow-up by local health departments for children with elevated blood lead levels; certifies and enforces performance standards for inspectors and contractors conducting lead hazard reduction; and performs environmental investigations of lead poisoned children. The lead program provides oversight for community education to parents, tenants, rental property owners, home owners and health care providers to enhance their roles in lead poisoning prevention. Maryland works in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Baltimore City and other local governments and non-profit organizations such as the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative to prevent childhood lead poisoning.

 Quotes

“We are making progress in the battle against childhood lead poisoning in Maryland. The Maryland Department of the Environment is committed to reducing exposure to lead in newer rental homes now covered under Maryland’s lead law and to enforcing the law for older rental units, including those in Baltimore City. We will work closely with our partners, such as the Department of Health, the Department of Housing and Community Development, Baltimore City, the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative, and the U.S. EPA to eliminate this completely preventable disease.”

–  Ben Grumbles, Secretary, Maryland Department of the Environment

“We are extremely pleased with the progress that the State’s health care providers, parents, and advocates have made over the last year in testing more children for lead, in conjunction with the Department of Health and the Department of Environment.  Together with the State’s recently announced efforts to increase resources for lead abatement and environmental case management through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, the increased testing helps to fulfill the State’s commitment to reduce and eliminate childhood lead poisoning in Maryland.”

–  Jinlene Chan, Acting Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services, Maryland Department of Health

“The Department of Housing and Community Development is proud to partner with the Department of the Environment and the Department of Health to support lead paint abatement in our state’s communities. Programs like the Lead Hazard Reduction Loan and Grant Program have been instrumental in the reduction of childhood lead poisoning cases and new initiatives like Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids will enable us to continue our positive progress to protect Maryland’s children from exposure to lead.”

–  Matt Heckles, Assistant Secretary, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development

Additional information

2016 Maryland Childhood Lead Registry Annual Surveillance Report

Graphic: Childhood blood lead surveillance statewide 1993-2016

Graphic: Childhood blood lead surveillance Baltimore City 1993-2016

Graphic: Change in 2016 Maryland blood testing rates by county

Lead Poisoning Prevention Week proclamation

Maryland Department of the Environment Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

Maryland lead law fact sheet

Maryland Department of Health

Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development

Baltimore City Health Department

U.S. EPA

Green & Healthy Homes Initiative

###

Media Contacts:

DHCD: Sara Luell, sara.luell@maryland.gov301-429-7803

Health: Brittany Fowler, Brittany.fowler@maryland.gov410-767-1368

MDE: Jay Apperson, jay.apperson@maryland.gov410-537-3003



Hogan Administration Awards Over $18 Million in Neighborhood Revitalization Funds

Hogan Administration Awards Over $18 Million in Neighborhood Revitalization Funds
Three programs provide support for 116 projects in 21 jurisdictions

Annapolis, MD (October 25, 2017) – Governor Larry Hogan today announced over $18 million in Fiscal Year 2018 neighborhood revitalization program awards. Grants from the Community Legacy program, the Baltimore Regional Neighborhood Initiative, and the Strategic Demolition Fund will support 116 projects in 21 jurisdictions across Maryland. All three revitalization programs are managed by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development and support business expansion and retention; streetscape improvements; homeownership and home rehabilitation incentives; commercial improvement programs; mixed-use development, and strategic demolition.

“These investments will help revitalize cities and towns across Maryland, leading to an increase in economic development and more jobs for Marylanders,” said Governor Hogan. “The awards will help local communities achieve their unique redevelopment goals and improve the quality of life for our citizens.”

Considered one of the state’s most flexible revitalization programs, Community Legacy awarded $5.55 million to 56 projects in designated Sustainable Communities throughout Maryland. Among others, these included repairs to the historic Cumberland Theatre in Allegany County, façade improvements to renovate and beautify the exteriors of properties on Smith Island in Somerset County, streetscape and sidewalk improvements in the Town of Chesapeake City in Cecil County, and a “Clean and Green” initiative in the Prince George’s County towns of Bladensburg, Colmar Manor, Cottage City, and Edmonston.

The Baltimore Regional Neighborhood Initiative awarded $8.75 million to 45 projects in Sustainable Community Areas in Baltimore City, including the inner beltway regions of Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties. Projects include residential property rehabilitation for residents of the Brooklyn Heights and Arundel Village neighborhoods of Anne Arundel County, rehabilitation of a 168 year-old, artist-owned warehouse within Baltimore’s Station North Arts and Entertainment District that provides studio and exhibition space, assisting homebuyers in the Dundalk community of Baltimore County, and supporting the construction of a multipurpose athletic field in the Farring Baybrook Park which serves the three neighborhoods of Brooklyn and Curtis Bay in south Baltimore and Brooklyn Park in Anne Arundel County.

In Fiscal Year 2018, the Strategic Demolition Fund awarded $3.85 million to 15 projects, including development of a community center in the Town of North Beach in Calvert County, refurbishing the parking lot of Waugh Chapel in the City of Cambridge in Dorchester County, and property acquisition and site development for the planned relocation of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park Headquarters to the Town of Williamsport in Washington County.

“With flexible programs and the technical expertise of our staff, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development improves the economic vitality and livability of Maryland’s neighborhoods,” said Secretary Kenneth C. Holt. “We will continue to work with local governments, nonprofits, and other partners to create thriving, attractive communities in every corner of our great state.”

For a full list of award winners, visit http://dhcd.maryland.gov/Documents/PressReleases/FY2018NRAwards.pdf

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT: Sara Luell, Director of Communications, sara.luell@maryland.gov, 301-429-7803



Hogan Administration Announces $490,000 in Community Services Block Grant Awards

Hogan Administration Announces $490,000 in Community Services Block Grant Awards

Funds will provide services for nearly 20,000 low-income residents

New Carrollton, Md. (October 20, 2017) – The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development today announced $490,000 in Community Services Block Grant awards. The grants to 12 nonprofits and units of local government will provide services to nearly 20,000 low-income Marylanders and will leverage nearly $700,000 in additional funding from private, nonprofit, and other partners.

“These awards will help provide much-needed resources and services to our low-income citizens,” said Governor Larry Hogan. “The organizations receiving this funding will help Marylanders in need to gain valuable access to education, employment, and other support services to help them succeed.”

Maryland receives nearly $10 million in federal funds through the Community Services Block Grant. By law, 90 percent of these funds go directly to support the work of the 17 Community Action Agencies in Maryland. Five percent of the funds are reserved for discretionary grants, which comprise the awards listed below. Funded programs provide a range of direct services designed to assist low-income individuals and families to attain the skills, knowledge, and support needed to achieve self-sufficiency. Community action agencies provide services in all 23 Maryland counties and the City of Baltimore. Services and activities may include housing, Head Start education for youth, nutrition programs, transportation programs, employment, and emergency services such as shelter or energy assistance.

“Our local government and Community Action Agency partners are vitally important to maintaining the safety net for the most vulnerable Marylanders,” said Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Kenneth C. Holt. “These awards will enable them to continue to deliver quality services and programs to our citizens, and we are proud to support their good work.”

The FY18 Community Services Block Grant awardees are:

Allegany County Human Services Development Commission, Inc. – $15,000
The Mobility Management program helps address the transportation barrier for low-income and elderly residents needing to access non-emergency medical health care appointments.

Anne Arundel County Community Action Agency, Inc. – $35,000
The Green Summer Works Program prepares low-income youth for success at school and the workplace. The program was developed to introduce youth to employment opportunities in the environmental and “green” sectors, while undergoing comprehensive workforce preparation, life skills, and financial literacy training.

Community Action Council of Howard County, Inc. – $40,000
The agency will use the funding for a full-time Employment Coach Case Manager to assist Head Start families with assessment of employment needs, development of employment opportunities, enrollment in certification programs, and removal of barriers to employment. This program will also promote job stability for the newly-employed.

Delmarva Community Services, Inc. – $40,000
The grant will allow the agency to provide gap services to a defined group of individuals who are often considered hard to serve and who need intensive case management and training. Service gaps identified included dentistry, home care and homeless hygiene kits, and intensive services under the agency’s Preparing Adults for Life program.

Harford Community Action Agency, Inc. – $20,000
The program will offer initial case management to all households who enter the agency’s food pantry and provide extensive case management for those who return for a subsequent month and are still in crisis.

Human Services Programs of Carroll County, Inc. – $24,500
The program will provide bundled services through leveraging funding from their Office of Heating and Energy Program partner. The participants will receive assessment and encouragement to access multiple services by providing additional case management and incentives.

Maryland CASH Campaign, Inc. – $90,500
The grant funding will be used to continue the Maryland Community Fellows Program. Graduate students will be placed in community action agencies and nonprofit organizations to address staff and volunteer gaps to ensure access to the EITC program and deliver high-quality, free tax preparation services through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program.

Maryland Community Action Partnership, Inc. (MCAP) – $100,000
MCAP will provide statewide communication and coordination to the state’s 17 community action agencies. Services will be rendered through training and technical assistance and will include skill sharing and knowledge advancement through conference, seminars, and communication.

Maryland Rural Development Corporation – $30,000
The agency’s Green Summer Youth Program will hire 24 low-income youth workers who will receive on-the-job training and green conservation and beautification work experience.

Shore UP!, Inc. – $40,000
The Youth Jobs Program will provide employment for low-income youth at nonprofit organizations in Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester counties. The participants will develop job-readiness skills, leadership skills, and financial literacy skills. Other opportunities will include college preparation and a vocation skills training program.

Spanish Speaking Communities of Maryland, Inc. – $35,000
The funding will enable the organization to continue to provide free consultations to target populations with very low incomes, those who speak little English or are illiterate, the unemployed and under-employed. Residents also come for a range of services and referrals related to nutrition, education, housing, and other needs.

Washington County Community Action Council, Inc. – $20,000
The agency will launch the first locally-available Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program in their service area. The program will provide free tax preparation services and enroll households into additional asset-building for financial education programs, such as savings bonds, energy consumption conservation, or financial literacy programs.

For more information on the Community Services Block Grant program, visit http://dhcd.maryland.gov/Communities/Pages/programs/CSBG.aspx.

 # # #

MEDIA CONTACT: Sara Luell, Director of Communications, sara.luell@maryland.gov, 301-429-7803



Governor Larry Hogan Highlights Economic Development, Job Creation Initiatives in Western Maryland

Secretary Kenneth Holt recently joined Governor Larry to highlight economic development initiatives in Western Maryland and tour downtown Cumberland.

Read the press release from Governor Hogan: http://governor.maryland.gov/2017/10/13/governor-larry-hogan-highlights-economic-development-job-creation-initiatives-in-western-maryland/



Hogan Administration Celebrates Over 1,000 Blighted Properties Removed Through Project C.O.R.E.

Hogan Administration Celebrates Over 1,000 Blighted Properties Removed Through Project C.O.R.E.
Administration Awards More Than $33 Million for 65 Projects, Leveraging $570 Million in Investments

ANNAPOLIS, MD – Governor Larry Hogan today announced that Maryland, in partnership with Baltimore City, has surpassed the milestone of 1,000 blighted properties removed in the city through the administration’s Project C.O.R.E. initiative. Project C.O.R.E., or Creating Opportunities for Renewal and Enterprise, is a multi-year, city-state initiative to remove vacant and derelict buildings in Baltimore and replace them with green space or the foundation for redevelopment.

As of the latest quarterly report, reporting through the end of Fiscal Year 2017, 1,154 units have been demolished and 32 have been stabilized, for a total of 1,186 units of blight removed.

“Project C.O.R.E. represents an unprecedented level of state investment in the revitalization of Baltimore City, and we are listening and responding to the unique needs of each community,” said Governor Hogan. “As we’ve demolished blight from Baltimore City, we have continued our extensive outreach to ensure that the redevelopment projects meet – and surpass – the community’s goals and visions for their neighborhoods.”

Additionally, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development announced the winners of nearly $15 million in Fiscal Year 2018 awards for Project C.O.R.E. demolition and redevelopment funds. The department selected 24 projects to receive approximately $15 million, which will leverage approximately $269 million in additional private and nonprofit sector investment. Since the launch of the initiative, the department has made 65 awards totaling more than $33 million and leveraging nearly $570 million.

“Project C.O.R.E. is helping to transform Baltimore neighborhoods into safe, thriving redeveloped communities with healthy housing opportunities for residents,” said Mayor Catherine E. Pugh. “Through the City’s and State’s coordinated efforts, we have taken down more than 1,000 buildings, which has made a tremendous impact on blight elimination and revitalization and has helped spur new investment across the City.”

One project supported through the initiative is the rehabilitation of the Hoen Lithograph building in the Collington Square neighborhood. Vacant for more than 35 years, the building’s primary tenant, Hoen & Company, was known as the oldest continuously operating lithographer in the United States. Once renovations are complete, the building will feature a cafe, event space, an adult literacy center, and a bookstore, along with a workforce incubator that will offer job training and employment opportunities for area residents. Like many Project C.O.R.E. activities, the renovation of the Hoen building has already had a ripple effect in the neighborhood, complementing other state investment in the community and attracting additional sources of support.

“Project C.O.R.E. is doing exactly what we hoped it would – helping to leverage additional investment in these neighborhoods, and so far, the state’s investment has garnered significant return from the private sector,” said Housing Secretary Kenneth C. Holt. “The support that we’re seeing from other investors, community leaders, and residents shows that this is a pivotal moment for the positive transformation of Baltimore, and an opportune time for the fresh approach of Project C.O.R.E.”

For more information about Project C.O.R.E., including the most recent award winners, visit: http://dhcd.maryland.gov/ProjectCORE.

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT: Sara Luell, Director of Communications, sara.luell@maryland.gov, 301-429-7803



Keep Maryland Beautiful Grant Applications Now Being Accepted

Keep Maryland Beautiful Grant Applications Now Being Accepted
More than $200,000 Available for Initiatives Throughout Maryland

Whitelock Community Farm in Baltimore City received a Spring 2017 Keep Maryland Beautiful Grant.

Whitelock Community Farm in Baltimore City received a Spring 2017 Keep Maryland Beautiful Grant.

ANNAPOLIS, MD – The Maryland Environmental Trust is now accepting applications for funding through Keep Maryland Beautiful, comprising five grants designed to help volunteer and nonprofit groups, communities and land trusts support environmental education projects, litter removal, citizen stewardship and solve natural resource issues in urban and rural areas.

Applications will be accepted through Nov. 15 for one of five grants in two categories: Environmental Education, Community Initiatives and Cleanup Grants for community groups and Land Trust Capacity, Excellence and Stewardship Grants for local land trusts in the state. Each organization may apply for one of the five grants per funding cycle.

Keep Maryland Beautiful is a program of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development and a recognized state affiliate of the national Keep America Beautiful program. The Maryland Department of Transportation has been a contributor to the program for 25 years. Maryland Environmental Trust, part of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, administers the program’s grants in partnership with these departments.

“The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development is proud to partner with the Maryland Environmental Trust to offer community groups and nonprofits Keep Maryland Beautiful grants to support environmental education projects, litter removal and citizen stewardship,” said Housing Secretary Kenneth C. Holt. “Providing funding for Clean Up & Green Up Maryland grants allows us to support our local stakeholders in the ongoing revitalization of their communities.”

In the most recent funding cycle, about 50 grants totaling more than $160,000 were awarded to municipalities, nonprofits and schools for beautification projects, community cleanup activities and environmental education programs in 19 counties and Baltimore City.

“Keep Maryland Beautiful is a success story for our communities and our environment,” said Maryland Environmental Trust Executive Director William Leahy. “Thanks to our partner agencies we will continue to find new ways to support efforts and programs that will inspire and engage Marylanders in the important work of stewardship of the places we care deeply about.”

The program’s timeline has changed to distribute grant money to recipients earlier in the year to help fund more projects in spring. Additionally the application process is streamlined and can be completed online at the Keep Maryland Beautiful website.

Grants and funding amount available are:

  • Aileen Hughes Grant of up to $2,000 is awarded to an individual representing a Maryland land trust for outstanding leadership, partnership and innovation in a conservation project or organization development.
  • Bill James Environmental Grant of up to $1,000 is awarded to school groups, science and ecology clubs and other nonprofit youth groups for proposed environmental education projects.
  • Clean Up & Green Up Maryland Grant of up to $5,000 is awarded to community groups and nonprofit organizations statewide to promote neighborhood cleanliness and beautification by increasing litter removal, greening activities, community education and citizen stewardship.
  • Janice Hollman Grant of up to $10,000 is awarded to land trusts throughout the state to increase capacity, support programming and innovation and foster stronger, better connected land trusts that will protect all natural resources and enhance the lives of Maryland citizens and generations to come.
  • Margaret Rosch Jones Grant of up to $2,000 is awarded to nonprofit groups or communities for an ongoing project or activity that has demonstrated success in solving an environmental issue. This award recognizes those organizations that have been actively educating people in their community about litter prevention, community beautification or reducing/eliminating the causes of a local environmental problem.

# # #



Lt. Governor Boyd K. Rutherford, Department of Housing and Community Development Host Project C.O.R.E. Community Forum in East Baltimore

Lt. Governor Boyd K. Rutherford, Department of Housing and Community Development Host Project C.O.R.E. Community Forum in East Baltimore
Lt. Governor Announces State Support for Demolition and Redevelopment of Northwood Commons

ANNAPOLIS, MD – Lt. Governor Boyd K. Rutherford today with the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development hosted a community forum at Morgan State University in East Baltimore focusing on Project C.O.R.E. – Creating Opportunities for Renewal and Enterprise – a multi-year, city-state partnership to demolish vacant and derelict buildings in Baltimore and replace them with green space or the foundation for redevelopment. The lieutenant governor was joined by Baltimore City Mayor Catherine E. Pugh, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Kenneth C. Holt, and Maryland Stadium Authority Senior Vice President Gary A. McGuigan, as well as Baltimore City officials and community leaders. During the forum, Lt. Governor Rutherford announced the state’s financial support for the redevelopment of the nearby Northwood Commons shopping center that will serve as a retail and commercial anchor for Morgan State University.

“Morgan State is a valued institution in this community, and for that reason I am pleased to announce the state’s financial support for the demolition and redevelopment of Northwood Commons,” said Lt. Governor Rutherford. “What is currently a blighted shopping center will soon become a thriving mixed-use town center which will serve as a retail and commercial hub for the surrounding community and for this university.”

“Through Project C.O.R.E. Baltimore is able to direct investment to all corners of the city and to create smart, sustainable neighborhoods,” said Mayor Catherine E. Pugh. “It provides an opportunity to mobilize the community vision that we all share in common. Together we will transform blighted areas of our city into bright spots that anchor healthy neighborhoods in Baltimore, and continually engaging residents is essential to this process.”

In addition to remarks from the lieutenant governor and mayor, Secretary Holt provided an overview of Project C.O.R.E., which is funding projects in East Baltimore such as the Hoen Lithograph building, an 80,000 square foot historic building that will be transformed into a job training facility, adult literacy center, and community and office space. A panel featuring Secretary Holt, Commissioner Michael Braverman of Baltimore City Department of Housing and Community Development, and Senior Vice President McGuigan answered questions related to Project C.O.R.E. Lt. Governor Rutherford also announced the awardees of the Keep Maryland Beautiful community sponsorships. Keep Maryland Beautiful is a multi-agency state program that focuses on neighborhood beautification statewide through increasing urban greening, citizen stewardship, community education, and litter removal activities. In Baltimore City, the program complements Project C.O.R.E. activities by ensuring that lots cleared of blight remain clean and green.

“In such a short time, Project C.O.R.E. has brought together public-private partnership at a level never before seen in the city,” said Secretary Holt.

Through Project C.O.R.E, the state is investing $75 million supported by an $18.5 million investment from Baltimore City over four years for demolition and stabilization of blighted properties. After the demolition phase, Project C.O.R.E. will be supported by more than $600 million in financing opportunities through existing DHCD programs which help revitalize and redevelop Maryland’s cities and towns. For more information about Project C.O.R.E., visit: http://dhcd.maryland.gov/ProjectCORE.

# # #



Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Announces Emergency Solutions Grant Awards

Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Announces Emergency Solutions Grant Awards
Over $2.9 million awarded to support homeless shelters and services

New Carrollton, Md. (September 6, 2017) – The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development today announced the recipients of Fiscal Year 2018 grants through the Emergency Solutions Grants program. Over $2.9 million in program grants will assist homeless shelters and support homeless services in 19 counties and five municipalities in Maryland. In Fiscal Year 2017, over 6,200 Marylanders experiencing or at risk of homelessness were assisted with services through the Emergency Solutions Grants program. The awards are expected to leverage over $3.4 million in additional funding.

“Homelessness affects all parts of Maryland,” said Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Kenneth C. Holt. “The state is proud to partner with local communities and nonprofit service providers through the Emergency Solutions Grants program to shelter and support this vulnerable population.”

Emergency Solutions Grants funds are used to support shelter operations, outreach, as well as prevention and rapid re-housing. Rapid re-housing is an important, evidence-based strategy that quickly moves homeless households back into housing and provides time-limited services that are scaled to the need of the family.

The Fiscal Year 2018 Emergency Solutions Grants program awardees are:

Allegany County – $128,000

  • Allegany County Human Resources Development Commission – $100,100
  • Family Crisis Resource Center – $27,900

City of Annapolis

  • Light House – $116,600

City of Baltimore

  • Strong City Baltimore / Youth Empowered Society – $80,000

Calvert County – $97,900

  • Calvert Affordable Housing Alliance – $25,300
  • Community Ministry of Calvert County – $13,200
  • Project ECHO – $59,400

Caroline County

  • Saint Martin’s Ministries – $38,500

Carroll County

  • Human Services Program – $111,900

Cecil County – $112,600

  • Cecil County Men’s Shelter – $27,100
  • Deep Roots, Inc. – $35,600
  • Human Services Development Corporation, Inc. – $49,900

Charles County – $97,200

  • Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, DC- Angel’s Watch – $32,500
  • LifeStyles of MD Foundation, Inc. – $31,800
  • Robert Fuller Transitional House – $32,900

Town of Denton

  • His Hope Haven (Winter Haven Shelter) – $108,900

Dorchester County – $122,250

  • Delmarva Community Services, Inc. – $117,900
  • Dorchester County – $4,350

Frederick County – $116,200

  • Advocates for Homeless Families – $51,300
  • Heartly House, Inc. – $64,900

City of Frederick – $99,900

  • Frederick Community Action Agency – $47,000
  • The Religious Coalition for Emergency Human Needs – $52,900

Garrett County

  • Garrett County Community Action Committee, Inc. – $105,100

Harford County – $130,050

  • Anna’s House / Associated Catholic Charities, Inc. – $10,400
  • Harford Community Action Agency, Inc. – $101,700
  • Harford County Department of Housing and Community Development – $9,350
  • Sexual Assault/Spousal Abuse Resource Center – $8,600

Howard County – $127,700

  • Bridges to Housing Stability, Inc. – $22,000
  • Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center – $14,000
  • HopeWorks of Howard County – $45,700
  • Howard County Department of Corrections – $46,000

Kent County

  • Saint Martin’s Ministries – $53,800

Prince George’s County

  • Prince George’s County – $80,000

Queen Anne’s County

  • Queen Anne’s County Housing & Community Services – $91,500

City of Salisbury – $126,400

  • City of Salisbury – $25,000
  • Diakonia, Inc. – $77,600
  • Samaritan Ministries – $23,800

Somerset County – $112,800

  • Catholic Charities Seton Center – $61,600
  • Somerset Committee for the Homeless, Inc. – $51,200

St. Mary’s County – $125,000

  • Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, DC- Angel’s Watch – $22,800
  • Three Oaks Center – $102,200

Talbot County

  • Neighborhood Service Center, Inc. – $81,900

Washington County – $143,250

  • CASA, Inc. – $19,900
  • REACH, Inc. – $58,300
  • Washington County – $4,350
  • Washington County Community Action Council, Inc. – $60,700

Worcester County – $119,900

  • Diakonia, Inc. – $90,200
  • Samaritan Ministries – $29,700

Training and Technical Assistance to Continuums of Care & Data Warehouse – $120,000

Special Population Homelessness Initiative – $293,477

TOTAL – $2,940,797

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT: Sara Luell, Director of Communications, sara.luell@maryland.gov, 301-429-7803



Email Subscription

To sign up for updates or to access your subscriber preferences, please enter your contact information below.







News Categories







Follow us on Twitter




Abell Foundation Affordable Housing Affordable Rental Housing Appliances Arts Incubator Baltimore Baltimore Regional Neighborhoods Initiative BARCO Be SMART Community Development Week Community Legacy Cooling Tips Customer Service DBED DHCD Economic Development Week Elkton Energy Efficiency Energy Saver energy star first time homebuyers food deserts Goldseker Foundation Governor Hogan Greenbuild Home improvements Homeowners Homeownership HUD Insulation Main Street Improvement Assistance Program Main Street Maryland Makerspace Maryland Film Festival Maryland Housing Conference Neighborhood Revitalization Net Zero Nonprofit Assistance Fund NSP3 Open Works Phantom Electricity Prince George's County Project CORE Robert W. Deutsch Foundation Save Money small business lending Station North Technical Assistance Grant water heater water sense